Vintage Watch Update – 6th January 2017 | 6.1.17

Opening our first vintage watch update of 2017 is a fantastic Rolex Oyster Perpetual Datejust Ref. 1600 from 1976. This watch has a fabulous, satin finished, champagne dial that is in outstanding original condition, with a rich depth of colour and a chamfered outer minutes/seconds track which creates a two-tone appearance and gives a greater sense of depth to the surface. The 1600 series Rolex Datejust has become one of the most iconic of Rolex’s vintage production and is also one of the largest, with a case diameter of 36mm. Although the smooth, chamfered bezel was a standard feature of other Rolex Oyster models, the Datejust is more usually seen with the reeded or milled bezels such as those found on the Refs. 1601 and 1603. This watch is accompanied by a Rolex wood and green leather presentation case and is fitted with its original Rolex Oyster bracelet which is date stamped for 1976. As part of the watch’s service and overhaul it has been pressure tested for water-resistance for depths up to 100 metres.

Up next is a lovely example of another iconic vintage watch, this is Omega’s Speedmaster Mark II. Created in 1968, the model entered Omega’s International Collection in 1969. The massive tonneau-form case was a dramatic departure from the more traditional circular style of the first Speedmaster models. Designed in the late 1960s, the watch’s design looked towards the more angular styles that would become a feature of 1970s watches. This watch is accompanied by an Omega red zipped and padded service pouch. If you’ve been following our Journal, you may have seen our new series where Black Bough clients talk about a favourite piece from their collection – No. 4 is about an Omega Speedmaster II – you’ll find the articles over on our Journal here: https://www.blackbough.co.uk/blog/ 

Up next is a 14ct yellow gold Rolex Oyster Perpetual Air-King from 1977. The handsome champagne dial is in outstanding condition and the clarity of the dial’s design is enhanced by the gold baton indexes that have black panels to their centres which increase the contrast between the numerals and the dial surface. The 14ct yellow gold case is rich in tone and retains good definition the its angles and edges. Automatically wound, the watch is powered by Rolex’s calibre 1520 movement with 26 jewels. The watch is accompanied by a green Rolex presentation case and is fitted with a handmade Christopher Clarke for Black Bough traditional dark brown lizard skin leather strap. As part of the watch’s service and overhaul it has been pressure tested for water-resistance for depths up to 100 metres.

Pictured above is a super crisp Jaeger-LeCoultre wristwatch which dates to 1957. In almost unused condition, this is a stunning wristwatch with a case diameter of 35mm. The silvered dial has a wonderful lustre and applied hour indexes which are curved to fit flush with the dial’s surface. The stainless steel case is in unpolished condition with crisp angles and edges to both the upper case and the multi-faceted screw-down case back. Manually wound, the P800 Jaeger-LeCoultre movement is also in outstanding condition and has damascened finishing to the plates. The watch is fitted to its original leather strap which appears to be unused and is set with a steel Montal pin buckle.

Moving back in time to the Art Deco period, we have just added this sensational Movado Chronometre Ermeto travelling watch which is made in silver with black lacquered surfaces. The silver case is hallmarked for 1931 placing this in the early period of the Ermeto’s production. The black lacquered dial is in excellent condition with a rich depth of colour and contrasting, faceted, silver baton indexes and arrow-tipped hands. The silver case has black lacquered sliding covers which have light scuffs and only two minor losses of lacquer to the top corners of each shutter.  This model incorporates Movado’s ‘automatic’ case winding system that was patented in 1928. The lower corner of the case has a ring fixture, allowing the watch to be used with a chain.

Next is an excellent example of the Omega Seamaster Ref. 14761 from 1960. The silvered dial is in outstanding original condition with a beautiful lustre. The stainless steel case has broad lugs with a gently chamfered bezel and screw-down case back that is centred with the Omega Seamaster emblem. Automatically wound, the watch is powered by an Omega calibre 552 with 24 jewels and precision regulation.

Dating to 1962, the automatic Tudor Oyster Prince Ref. 7965 shown above has a classic silvered dial with applied steel coloured triangular indexes. The robust stainless steel Rolex Oyster case has a smooth chamfered bezel and typical screw-down crown and case back. This watch has been fitted with a handmade Christopher Clarke for Black Bough traditional pig skin leather strap. As part of the watch’s service and overhaul it has been pressure tested for water-resistance for depths up to 100 metres.

bove is an elegant Omega Genève Ref. 993 gold dress watch made in 1962. The case is made in 9ct yellow gold and has a relatively slim profile whilst the smart silvered dial has applied gold indexes which are centrally set with black inserts. Manually wound, this watch is powered by an Omega calibre 600. This watch is fitted with a handmade Christopher Clarke for Black Bough traditional black lizard skin leather strap.

Next is an unusual Longines Admiral Ref. 2315 wristwatch which was made in c. 1972. This watch has a silvered dial with vertical satin finish and unusual applied indexes which have royal blue inserts. In addition to their luminescent panels, the baton hands have three different finishes with ribbed edges, satin surfaces and blue highlights to match the dial’s surface and numerals. The minutes/seconds track is also finished in blue. Cased in stainless steel, the upper body is made from a solid block with recessed winding crown and a screw-down case back. This watch is fitted with its original stainless steel Longines link bracelet which has an adjustable folding clasp; the bracelet can be detached and replaced with a leather strap if preferred. Automatically wound, this watch is powered by the fast beat Longines calibre 6651. The dial is in good original condition and the case and bracelet have light scuffs and scratches throughout from past use.

Also dating to the early 1970s is the Omega Ref. 166.0163 Genève model shown photographed above. The watch has a classic silvered dial with applied baton indexes that have black inserts – the hands are styled to match with both black and luminescent panels. Cased in stainless steel, the upper body is made from a single block of steel with integrated chamfered bezel and a separate screw-down case back. The watch is automatically wound via an Omega calibre 1012 which has a hack feature and provision for quick date change; when the crown is pulled out to its first setting, the date can be advanced either forwards or backwards.

Recently added to our website is the fantastic new book: Patek Philippe, The Authorised Biography by Nicholas Foulkes. As Foulkes writes in his introduction, “Patek Philippe is a watch brand that inspires an almost religious fervour in its devotees”. Being a total Patekaholic myself, these are sentiments I can relate to and it was a very welcome Christmas present when my copy of this book turned up on Christmas eve. Foulkes is an excellent writer and with wit and scholarly insight, the story of Patek Philippe unfolds from the birth of its founders to the present day. The book is filled with fascinating facts and some wonderful anecdotes – one of my favourites being a rather tardy letter which Tsar Nicholas II sent to Patek Philippe to thank them for, let’s face it rather a special watch (an 18ct gold, hunting cased, perpetual calendar, minute repeating, moon-phase watch) which they had presented to him….10 years earlier.

To automatically receive these updates via email, please select the ‘Join our Mailing List’ tab at the bottom of any of our web pages.