Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940

Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940

A steel and leather covered case winding centre seconds travelling watch

A most attractive version of the Movado travelling or ‘purse’ watch, this Ermeto has a twin-track calibrated dial and dates to the mid to late 1930s. The majority of Ermeto models were made either without seconds hands or with a subsidiary seconds dial, this example features the more unusual centre seconds dial. There are two concentric calibrated tracks – the inner ring is calibrated for minutes whilst the ring above is calibrated for seconds. The seconds hands itself is longer than the minute hand and falls directly within the seconds calibrations, whilst the minute hand indicates to its own track. The movement is Movado’s calibre 157 which uses the firms calibre 150 as its base, with the addition of a centre seconds module. The wheel work and tension spring for the centre seconds sits above the movement’s backplate and, as this inevitably increases the depth of the movement, to avoid increasing the depth of the case, the case back is machined out in a key shape to accommodate these extra movement parts.

Movado’s Ermeto models were designed to be used with or without a chain and could simply be placed in a pocket or bag. The name Ermeto was derived from the Greek meaning ‘sealed’ and emphasized the model’s resistance to dirt and moisture. Movado began marketing the the Ermeto in 1926 and the model was initially launched with Movado’s calibre 150MN, the same movement as found in the present watch. Over the years, the Ermeto was made with a variety of different case and dial designs and became one of the company’s most recognised and iconic pieces. Andy Warhol, who was a great fan of Movado, owned at least 6 different versions of the Ermeto from a wide range of periods.


Technical details

[M] Movado calibre 157 (base calibre 150) wound via action of the sliding covers, lever escapement, 15 jewels, compensation balance, silvered dial, raised gilded Arabic and square indexes, blued steel hands, centre seconds, twin tracking for minutes with separate seconds track above [C] steel case, the inner case with retractable hinged stand to the back, sliding covers with leather covering, opening and closing on runners [S] case, dial and movement signed

Measurements

Width when closed: 49mm
Width when opened: 74mm
Height: 35mm
Depth to centre of crystal: 10mm
Depth to centre of covers: 15mm
Weight: 75g

This watch has been fully serviced and overhauled and is sold with a one year guarantee and detailed Black Bough certificate.

SKU: WWMEPC Categories: , Brand:

Description

Movado Ermeto vintage travelling watch, circa 1935-1940
A steel and leather covered case winding centre seconds travelling watch

A most attractive version of the Movado travelling or ‘purse’ watch, this Ermeto has a twin-track calibrated dial and dates to the mid to late 1930s. The majority of Ermeto models were made either without seconds hands or with a subsidiary seconds dial, this example features the more unusual centre seconds dial. There are two concentric calibrated tracks – the inner ring is calibrated for minutes whilst the ring above is calibrated for seconds. The seconds hands itself is longer than the minute hand and falls directly within the seconds calibrations, whilst the minute hand indicates to its own track. The movement is Movado’s calibre 157 which uses the firms calibre 150 as its base, with the addition of a centre seconds module. The wheel work and tension spring for the centre seconds sits above the movement’s backplate and, as this inevitably increases the depth of the movement, to avoid increasing the depth of the case, the case back is machined out in a key shape to accommodate these extra movement parts.

Movado’s Ermeto models were designed to be used with or without a chain and could simply be placed in a pocket or bag. The name Ermeto was derived from the Greek meaning ‘sealed’ and emphasized the model’s resistance to dirt and moisture. Movado began marketing the the Ermeto in 1926 and the model was initially launched with Movado’s calibre 150MN, the same movement as found in the present watch. Over the years, the Ermeto was made with a variety of different case and dial designs and became one of the company’s most recognised and iconic pieces. Andy Warhol, who was a great fan of Movado, owned at least 6 different versions of the Ermeto from a wide range of periods.


Technical details

[M] Movado calibre 157 (base calibre 150) wound via action of the sliding covers, lever escapement, 15 jewels, compensation balance, silvered dial, raised gilded Arabic and square indexes, blued steel hands, centre seconds, twin tracking for minutes with separate seconds track above [C] steel case, the inner case with retractable hinged stand to the back, sliding covers with leather covering, opening and closing on runners [S] case, dial and movement signed

Measurements

Width when closed: 49mm
Width when opened: 74mm
Height: 35mm
Depth to centre of crystal: 10mm
Depth to centre of covers: 15mm
Weight: 75g

This watch has been fully serviced and overhauled and is sold with a one year guarantee and detailed Black Bough certificate.

£795.00 [Sold]