No Recipe Recipe NY Times
No Recipe Recipe NY Times
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes - Sam Sifton
No Recipe Recipe NY Times

The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes – Sam Sifton

Sam Sifton is the founding editor of New York Times Cooking. This is a book of ideas rather than a book of follow-to-the-letter recipes and as such you probably need to have some cooking experience under your belt in order to realise some of the ideas. It also relies on the reader having some idea of how much food you want to eat and therefore how much to cook; you need the experience of understanding approximately how much dried pasta you need per person for example. It also means that there are no recipes for cakes and biscuits as baking needs much more precise instructions.

That said the ideas for food in this book are really good and will allow the reader or cook the freedom to take these ideas and run with them. Sifton acknowledges that some of the suggestions or inauthentic – he says of the idea for this pasta with a speedy sausage sauce ‘I’m not serving this to your nonna, but on a Thursday night it’s about the greatest thing imaginable.’

The ideas include ketchup with kimchi fried rice, ham and radicchio on toast and fried halloumi with a cucumber salad.

Hardback. 242 pages.

Measurements:

17.5cm x 23.5cm x 2cm

£20.00

1 in stock

SKU: 9781529109832 Categories: , , Brand:

Description

The New York Times No-Recipe Recipes – Sam Sifton

Sam Sifton is the founding editor of New York Times Cooking. This is a book of ideas rather than a book of follow-to-the-letter recipes and as such you probably need to have some cooking experience under your belt in order to realise some of the ideas. It also relies on the reader having some idea of how much food you want to eat and therefore how much to cook; you need the experience of understanding approximately how much dried pasta you need per person for example. It also means that there are no recipes for cakes and biscuits as baking needs much more precise instructions.

That said the ideas for food in this book are really good and will allow the reader or cook the freedom to take these ideas and run with them. Sifton acknowledges that some of the suggestions or inauthentic – he says of the idea for this pasta with a speedy sausage sauce ‘I’m not serving this to your nonna, but on a Thursday night it’s about the greatest thing imaginable.’

The ideas include ketchup with kimchi fried rice, ham and radicchio on toast and fried halloumi with a cucumber salad.

Hardback. 242 pages.

Measurements:

17.5cm x 23.5cm x 2cm