Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery
Andrew Grima - The Father of Modern Jewellery

Andrew Grima – The Father of Modern Jewellery

As the subtitle of this book states, Andrew Grima really is the father of modern jewellery. He established a new vocabulary for jewellery and his designs from the 60s are now hugely sought after. He was determined to banish the traditional flower spray brooches of yesteryear and create exciting new pieces that chimed with the changing times. His Jermyn Street store was equally daring and confrontational in its design with a facade designed by the abstract sculptor Bryan Kneale. From this store the glitterati of the age bought jewellery; he subsequently opened further stores in Sydney, New York , Tokyo and Gstaad.

What makes Grima of interest to those passionate about watches are his collaborations with Omega and Pulsar. Watch brands have at times been rather traditional in their ideas of how watches can look – this has resulted in tiny refinements of classic watches. Some of the most exciting watches have, however, come to pass via watch brands collaborating with jewellers – Patek Philippe’s work with the Swiss jeweller Gilbert Albert, for example, resulted in a range of daring asymmetric watches. Andrew Grima collaborated with Omega in 1970 and Pulsar in 1976. Grima’s work with Omega resulted in a collection known as About Time, Albert had worked with Omega previously but only on bracelet design. Grima went all out on the About Time collection; it comprised 86 individual pieces, 55 of which were watches, they contained Omega movements but took the form of pendants, bracelet watches and ring watches. The collection launched at the Goldsmiths’ Hall in London on 4th May 1970 and caused a sensation.

Grima later worked with Omega on some more designs, contributing to their Jeux D’Or, Constellation and de Ville ranges, but it is the About Time works that are the apogee of his watch design work.

Hardback, 336 pages.

Measurements:

30.5cm x 24.5cm x 4cm

£65.00

2 in stock

SKU: 9781788841061 Categories: , , Brand:

Description

Andrew Grima – The Father of Modern Jewellery

As the subtitle of this book states, Andrew Grima really is the father of modern jewellery. He established a new vocabulary for jewellery and his designs from the 60s are now hugely sought after. He was determined to banish the traditional flower spray brooches of yesteryear and create exciting new pieces that chimed with the changing times. His Jermyn Street store was equally daring and confrontational in its design with a facade designed by the abstract sculptor Bryan Kneale. From this store the glitterati of the age bought jewellery; he subsequently opened further stores in Sydney, New York , Tokyo and Gstaad.

What makes Grima of interest to those passionate about watches are his collaborations with Omega and Pulsar. Watch brands have at times been rather traditional in their ideas of how watches can look – this has resulted in tiny refinements of classic watches. Some of the most exciting watches have, however, come to pass via watch brands collaborating with jewellers – Patek Philippe’s work with the Swiss jeweller Gilbert Albert, for example, resulted in a range of daring asymmetric watches. Andrew Grima collaborated with Omega in 1970 and Pulsar in 1976. Grima’s work with Omega resulted in a collection known as About Time, Albert had worked with Omega previously but only on bracelet design. Grima went all out on the About Time collection; it comprised 86 individual pieces, 55 of which were watches, they contained Omega movements but took the form of pendants, bracelet watches and ring watches. The collection launched at the Goldsmiths’ Hall in London on 4th May 1970 and caused a sensation.

Grima later worked with Omega on some more designs, contributing to their Jeux D’Or, Constellation and de Ville ranges, but it is the About Time works that are the apogee of his watch design work.

Hardback, 336 pages.

Measurements:

30.5cm x 24.5cm x 4cm